The Royal Ballet’s Festival of New Choreography: A Disappointing Display of Stagnation

The Royal Ballet’s Festival of New Choreography promises to showcase innovative and exciting possibilities for ballet as an art form. However, the opening performance, “Dark with Excessive Bright” by choreographer Robert Binet, reveals a disheartening truth about the state of ballet today.

While Binet has demonstrated talent in the past, this particular work falls short of expectations. The piece consists of three simultaneous dances performed on separate stages, a concept that has been explored before by choreographer Merce Cunningham. However, where Cunningham’s simultaneous dances were distinct and exhilarating, Binet’s offering lacks originality, energy, and purpose.

The dancers wear body tights in various shades of beige, with translucent veils draped over their torsos. The music, composed by Missy Mazzoli, fails to captivate, instead relying on superficial effects. Binet’s choreography often falls into the trap of showcasing clichéd ballet movements without adding anything new or meaningful.

Furthermore, the performance highlights the shortcomings of the Royal Ballet’s current point shoes. The women’s blocked shoes appear crude and poorly crafted, detracting from the elegant illusion that ballet strives to create. It is disheartening to see such a prestigious company embrace subpar footwear.

While it is commendable that the performance includes same-sex partnering, it feels more like a token gesture than a genuine exploration of equality. Men and women never dance side by side, and their footwork remains distinct and disconnected. It is time for ballet to evolve beyond rigid gender norms and embrace new possibilities.

Overall, the Festival of New Choreography’s opening performance fails to inspire or push boundaries. Instead, it serves as a reminder of the stagnation and lack of creativity that can plague ballet as an art form. It is crucial for the Royal Ballet and other companies to seek out truly innovative choreographers who can breathe new life into this beautiful art. Only then can ballet truly progress and captivate audiences in the modern world.

FAQ Section:

Q: What is the Royal Ballet’s Festival of New Choreography?
A: The Royal Ballet’s Festival of New Choreography is an event that showcases innovative and exciting possibilities for ballet as an art form.

Q: Who is the choreographer of the opening performance?
A: The choreographer of the opening performance is Robert Binet.

Q: Why does the article mention that the opening performance falls short of expectations?
A: The article mentions that the opening performance falls short of expectations because it lacks originality, energy, and purpose.

Q: What is the concept of the performance?
A: The performance consists of three simultaneous dances performed on separate stages.

Q: Who is the composer of the music used in the performance?
A: The composer of the music used in the performance is Missy Mazzoli.

Q: What are the shortcomings of the Royal Ballet’s current point shoes?
A: The article mentions that the women’s blocked shoes appear crude and poorly crafted.

Q: Does the performance include same-sex partnering?
A: Yes, the performance includes same-sex partnering.

Q: How does the article describe the inclusion of same-sex partnering in the performance?
A: The article mentions that the inclusion of same-sex partnering feels more like a token gesture than a genuine exploration of equality.

Q: What is the overall opinion of the article about the opening performance?
A: The overall opinion of the article is that the opening performance fails to inspire or push boundaries.

Q: What does the article suggest for the future of ballet as an art form?
A: The article suggests that ballet should seek out truly innovative choreographers who can breathe new life into the art form.

Key Terms or Jargon:

– Ballet: A classical dance form characterized by grace, precision, and formalized steps and gestures.
– Choreographer: An artist who creates and arranges dances.
– Point shoes: Specialized ballet shoes that allow dancers to stand on the tips of their toes.
– Same-sex partnering: The act of two individuals of the same sex dancing together as partners in a performance.

Suggested Related Links:

Royal Ballet Website
Merce Cunningham Website
Missy Mazzoli Website